Researchers develop printable lasers

(Phys.org)—A way of printing lasers using everyday inkjet technology has been created by scientists. The development has a wide range of possible applications, ranging from biomedical testing to laser arrays for displays.

Bouncing signals off ceiling can rev up data centers

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers have a startlingly upbeat idea for data center managers coping with packed rooms, Internet traffic bursts, and high costs looming in having to reconfigure data center designs. The researchers ...

Google to build ultra high-speed broadband networks

Google announced plans Wednesday to build experimental ultra high-speed broadband networks that would deliver Internet speeds 100 times faster than those of today to up to half a million Americans.

The Ultimate Long Distance Communication

Anyone who's vacationed in the mountains or lived on a farm knows that it's hard to get good internet access or a strong cell phone signal in a remote area. Communicating across great distances has always been a challenge. ...

New space race to bring satellite internet to the world

Anxiety has set in across the space industry ever since the world's richest man, Jeff Bezos, revealed Project Kuiper: a plan to put 3,236 satellites in orbit to provide high-speed internet across the globe.

How smart technology gadgets can avoid speed limits

Speed limits apply not only to traffic. There are limitations on the control of light as well, in optical switches for internet traffic, for example. Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology now understand why it is ...

Vitamin B12: Power broker to the microbes

Constant jostling for precious commodities—money, oil, high-speed Internet access, our morning coffee—shapes the world we live in.

US boosting broadband speed, but growth uneven

Americans are generally getting much faster Internet speeds than a few years ago, but growth is uneven depending on the type of connections, a government report said Wednesday.

70% of Americans have high-speed Internet

The percentage of Americans with high-speed Internet connections at home has reached 70 percent, while just three percent still use dial-up to go online, a study showed Monday.

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