Attosecond camera for nanostructures

Physicists based at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics have observed a nanoscale light-matter phenomenon which lasts for only attoseconds.

Ultra-fast X-ray lasers illuminate elusive atomic spins

A quick flash of light can make ordinary materials extraordinary, potentially inducing qualities such as the perfect efficiency of superconductivity even at room temperature. But these subatomic transformations are infamously ...

A sense for infrared light

Laser physicists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics developed a measuring system for light waves in the near-infrared range.

Superconductivity without cooling

Superconductivity is a remarkable phenomenon: superconductors can transport electric current without any resistance and thus without any losses whatsoever. It is already in use in some niche areas, for example as magnets ...

Creating bright X-ray pulses in the laser lab

To create X-rays—short wave radiation—scientists at TU Vienna start out with very long wavelengths—infrared laser. Long wavelength laser pulses rip atoms out of metal and accelerate them, which leads to emission of ...

Laser-induced damage in focus

The transformation of infrared light to a different wavelength, such as visible light, is important in many applications. Some of the most efficient semiconductor lasers operate in the infrared region of the spectrum, whereas ...

New method for studying the interaction between light and matter

Pulses of light are very useful for probing the inner workings of atoms, molecules and solids. Eiji Takahashi and co‐workers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, in collaboration with the Center for Free-Electron ...

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