Food scientists slice time off salmonella identification process

Researchers from Cornell University, the Mars Global Food Safety Center in Beijing, and the University of Georgia have developed a method for completing whole-genome sequencing to determine salmonella serotypes in just two ...

Making infant formula more like human breast milk

U.K.-based scientists have engineered plants to produce an oil that mimics the chemical structure of human milk fat, a major component of breast milk. Previous studies suggest the human form of this molecule, triacylglycerol, ...

Technology extends shelf life of dairy exports

A suite of drying technology platforms developed by researchers at Monash University could help extend the shelf life of Australia's powdered dairy exports – including infant formula – while meeting stringent safety and ...

How a beneficial gut microbe adapted to breast milk

Breast milk provides vital nutrients not only to infants, but also to beneficial microbes that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. A study published April 6 in Cell Chemical Biology shows that a bacterial species called Bifidobacterium ...

Pregnant women and new mothers feel watched and judged

In a small study published in Families Relationships and Society, researchers interviewed mother-grandmother pairs and found that community surveillance of pregnant women and infant feeding had significantly increased between ...

Food scientists: We can detect much more food fraud

Researchers from University of Copenhagen have reviewed the use of NIR spectroscopy to detect food fraud in a special issue of the scientific journal Current Opinion in Food Science, which reports on food science innovation.

Nanoparticles in baby formula: should parents be worried?

There's a lot of stuff you'd expect to find in baby formula: proteins, carbs, vitamins, essential minerals. But parents probably wouldn't anticipate finding extremely small, needle-like particles. Yet this is exactly what ...

Bacteriophage treatment decontaminates infant formula

A phage showed strong anti-microbial activity against a type of food-borne bacterium that often kills infants after infecting them via infant formula. Phages are viruses that infect only bacteria. The research is published ...

page 1 from 2