How close to invisible can a mirror be?

(Phys.org)—In 2011, mathematicians Alexander Plakhov and Vera Roshchina proved that objects with mirror surfaces cannot be perfectly invisible. Now in a new study, Plakhov has returned to the problem, asking just how close ...

DNA: The next hot material in photonics?

Using DNA from salmon, researchers in South Korea hope to make better biomedical and other photonic devices based on organic thin films. Often used in cancer treatments and health monitoring, thin films have all the capabilities ...

Large-scale study of genetic data shows humans still evolving

In a study analyzing the genomes of 210,000 people in the United States and Britain, researchers at Columbia University find that the genetic variants linked to Alzheimer's disease and heavy smoking are less frequent in people ...

Tech companies unlikely to follow S&P's new Snap-inspired rules

When the company that produces the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index announced this month that it would exclude the corporate parent of Snapchat from its benchmark market measure, the move was cheered by advocates of better ...

Exotic quantum states made from light

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are sufficiently concentrated and cooled. The individual particles ...

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