Related topics: fuel cell · catalyst · hydrogen gas · oxygen · molecules

Nanotubes change the shape of water

First, according to Rice University engineers, get a nanotube hole. Then insert water. If the nanotube is just the right width, the water molecules will align into a square rod.

Team's pic of crack in the act could prevent engineering failures

In work that could help prevent the failure of everything from bridges to dental implants, a team led by a researcher at Texas A&M University has taken the first 3-D image of a microscopic crack propagating through a metal ...

Transforming gas into fuels with better alloys

Technological advances in oil and gas well stimulation over the past decade now allow for the production of natural gas from shale gas trapped in rock formations underground. With the sudden increase in the availability of ...

Hybrid catalyst with high enantiomer selectivity

A group of Japanese researchers has developed a technology to create a hybrid catalyst from simple-structured, commercially available rhodium and organic catalysts, which reduces chemical waste and produces molecules with ...

Dental plaque is no match for catalytic nanoparticles

Combine a diet high in sugar with poor oral hygiene habits and dental cavities, or caries, will likely result. The sugar triggers the formation of an acidic biofilm, known as plaque, on the teeth, eroding the surface. Early ...

Computing power solves molecular mystery

Chemical reactions take place around us all the time—in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and in the factories that make products we use in everyday life. And those reactions are unexpectedly fast. Given optimal conditions, ...

An atom-thick graphene membrane for industrial gas separation

Chemical engineers at EPFL have demonstrated for the first time that an atom-thick graphene membrane can separate gas mixtures with a high-efficiency. The "ultimate" membrane is scalable, making it a breakthrough for industrial ...

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