Nanotubes change the shape of water

First, according to Rice University engineers, get a nanotube hole. Then insert water. If the nanotube is just the right width, the water molecules will align into a square rod.

Transforming gas into fuels with better alloys

Technological advances in oil and gas well stimulation over the past decade now allow for the production of natural gas from shale gas trapped in rock formations underground. With the sudden increase in the availability of ...

Computing power solves molecular mystery

Chemical reactions take place around us all the time—in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and in the factories that make products we use in everyday life. And those reactions are unexpectedly fast. Given optimal conditions, ...

Water may be key to understanding sweetness

A cranberry, honey or a candy bar—which tastes the sweetest? These foods contain sugars that humans can perceive differently. A cranberry seems tart, whereas a candy bar can be excessively sweet, and honey is somewhere ...

THz spectroscopy could help explain water's anomalies

Liquid water sustains life on earth, but its physical properties remain mysterious among scientific researchers. Recently, a team of Swiss researchers used existing THz spectroscopy techniques to measure liquid water's hydrogen ...

Approaching an ideal amino acid synthesis using hydrogen

Osaka University researchers demonstrated a reductive alkylation method for the functionalization of substituted amines using hydrogen, which is efficiently catalyzed by innocuous main-group catalysts. Their reaction generated ...

Precise deuteration using heavy water

NUS chemists have developed a more effective method using heavy water splitting to swap hydrogen atoms on organic molecules with their heavier cousins (deuterium) for pharmaceutical applications.

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