Related topics: water molecules

Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages

Protein cages—capsule-like structures made up of numerous protein molecules—perform roles in nature that have inspired their application in areas such as drug delivery. Their controlled assembly is therefore of particular ...

New core-shell catalyst for ethanol fuel cells

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and the University of Arkansas have developed a highly efficient catalyst for extracting electrical energy from ethanol, an easy-to-store ...

Record efficiency for perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Efficient near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes of perovskite have been produced in a laboratory at Linköping University. The external quantum efficiency is 21.6 percent, which is a record. The results have been published ...

Understanding and controlling the molecule that made the universe

Trihydrogen, or H3+, is acknowledged by scientists as the molecule that made the universe. In recent issues of Nature Communications and the Journal of Chemical Physics, Michigan State University researchers employed high-speed ...

When changing one atom makes molecules better

The development and improvement of pharmaceuticals plays the central role in the ongoing battle against human disease. Organic synthesis is the field that enables these developments as it offers the toolbox to diversify chemical ...

Forming the ion that made the universe

The trihydrogen cation, H3+, is the starting point for almost all molecules in the universe. Typically, H3+ is formed by collisions involving hydrogen gas, but its chemistry at the molecular level is relatively unknown. When ...

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Hydrogen bond

A hydrogen bond is the attractive interaction of a hydrogen atom with an electronegative atom, like nitrogen, oxygen or fluorine (thus the name "hydrogen bond", which must not be confused with a covalent bond to hydrogen). The hydrogen is covalently bonded to another electronegative atom. The energy of a hydrogen bond (typically 5 to 30 kJ/mole) is comparable to that of weak covalent bonds (155 kJ/mol), and a typical covalent bond is only 20 times stronger than an intermolecular hydrogen bond. These bonds can occur between molecules (intermolecularly), or within different parts of a single molecule (intramolecularly). The hydrogen bond is stronger than a van der Waals interaction, but weaker than covalent, or ionic bonds. This type of bond occurs in both inorganic molecules such as water and organic molecules such as DNA.

Intermolecular hydrogen bonding is responsible for the high boiling point of water (100 °C). This is because of the strong hydrogen bond, as opposed to other group 16 hydrides. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is partly responsible for the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of proteins and nucleic acids.

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