Unearthing the sweet potato proteome

The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don't know much about ...

Milestone for the analysis of human proteomes

Researchers led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) report on the synthesis of a library of more than 330,000 reference peptides representing essentially all canonical proteins of the human proteome. It is a major ...

Quantitating the complete human proteome

Reporting in the journal Cell, Senior Research Scientist Dr. Ulrike Kusebauch, of Institute for Systems Biology (ISB), describes the results of a collaboration between scientists at ISB, ETH Zurich and a number of other contributing ...

New protein manufacturing process unveiled

Researchers from Northwestern University and Yale University have developed a user-friendly technology to help scientists understand how proteins work and fix them when they are broken. Such knowledge could pave the way for ...

Facebook for the proteome

There are approximately 20,000 human genes that encode proteins, but despite remarkable progress since the human genome was first sequenced more than a decade ago, scientists still understand in detail how only a small fraction ...

Mapping proteins in space and time within cells

How many types of proteins are there in a cell? How many of each type are there and where are they at any given time? New methods may shed light on these fundamental biological questions.

Filling in the gaps on the protein map

Substantial progress has been made in decoding the human proteome. Under the leadership of the Technische Universität München researchers have now mapped more than 18,000 human proteins—92 percent of the entire proteome. ...

Looking at proteins to make new medicines and better wine

The Human Genome Project was completed in 2003, mapping out all of the genes of the human genome. When the first draft of results were published many were surprised that we had only 24,000 genes. This seemed like an unremarkable ...

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