Grassy beginning for earliest Homo

In 2013, an ASU research team found the oldest known evidence of our own genus, Homo, at Ledi-Geraru in the lower Awash Valley of Ethiopia. A jawbone with teeth was dated to 2.8 million years ago, about 400,000 years earlier ...

The end of physics? Plus new gene editing dispute

It was, potentially, "the most important discovery in particle physics in a half-century," "a totally unanticipated new elementary particle six times heavier than the recently discovered Higgs particle," according to the ...

Discoverer of Lucy skeleton hopes to find what made us human

This month marks the 40th anniversary of the discovery of Lucy, the partial skeleton of an apelike creature that walked upright 3.5 million years ago. The 1974 find would forever change humanity's understanding of where our ...

Origins of genomic 'dark matter' discovered

A duo of scientists at Penn State University has achieved a major milestone in understanding how genomic "dark matter" originates. This "dark matter"—called non-coding RNA—does not contain the blueprint for making proteins ...

Handaxe design reveals distinct Neanderthal cultures

A study by a postgraduate researcher at the University of Southampton has found that Neanderthals were more culturally complex than previously acknowledged. Two cultural traditions existed among Neanderthals living in what ...

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