Syntax is not unique to human language

Human communication is powered by rules for combining words to generate novel meanings. Such syntactical rules have long been assumed to be unique humans. A new study, published in Nature Communications, show that Japanese ...

Behavioral studies from mobile crowd-sensing

Using mobile phones for research is not new. However, interpreting the data collected from volunteers' own smart phones—which has the potential to emulate randomised trials—can advance research into human behaviour. In ...

What 15 years of mobile data can say about us

Large-scale anonymised datasets from mobile phones can give a better picture of society than ever before available. Mobile phone use helps us understand social networks, mobility and human behaviour. A review article recently ...

Genes responsible for increased activity during the summer

The warm temperature on a summer's day is often a time for relaxing, but researchers from the University of Leicester have suggested that a 'thermosensory' gene could be responsible for changes in behaviour in different climates.

Grey matter matters when it comes to feeling pain

Like humans, fish recoil from pain. But the fish pain reflex mechanism operates quite differently to the way it works in humans, University of Queensland research shows.

Pumas in populated areas kill more and eat less

Female pumas in areas with a high density of housing kill more deer but eat less of the carcasses than those in areas with little housing, finds a study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Caring and sharing is monkey business

Chimpanzees, much like children, can learn to be kind by observing and experiencing the kindness of others, according to new research by the University of St Andrews.

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