Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity

The human ear, like those of other mammals, is so extraordinarily sensitive that it can detect sound-wave-induced vibrations of the eardrum that move by less than the width of an atom. Now, researchers at MIT have discovered ...

The melodious mouse that sings for sex

A small, brown mouse found in the forests of Central America bucks the rodent trend of conversing in high-pitched squeaks often inaudible to the human ear.

Nanopores underlie our ability to tune in to a single voice

Even in a crowded room full of background noise, the human ear is remarkably adept at tuning in to a single voice—a feat that has proved remarkably difficult for computers to match. A new analysis of the underlying mechanisms, ...

Sonata in LHCb: The sound of antimatter (w/ Video)

In a recent paper the LHCb collaboration at CERN observed two particles changing from matter into antimatter and back again. Now the collaboration has turned that data into sound, so that you can listen to the music of antimatter.

Crickets' calling song hits the high notes

(Phys.org) —Research has detailed how acoustic communication has evolved within a unique species of cricket which exploits extremely high frequency harmonics to interact.

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