Why money cannot 'buy' housework

If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his ...

When health deteriorates, who does the housework?

Older married women shoulder more housework than their husbands do even when neither of them are in the labor force—and health problems she may have don't change that arrangement unless they are significant.

Household chores: Women still do more

Canadian women of all ages still tend to do more household chores than their male partners, no matter how much they work or earn in a job outside the home. Findings from a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles demonstrate ...

Who does most of the housework in multicultural Britain?

The first ever nationally representative study has looked at how housework is organised by couples across different ethnic groups in Britain. It finds that Black Caribbean men have the least traditional attitudes to gender ...

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Homemaking

Homemaking is a mainly American term for the management of a home, otherwise known as housework, housekeeping or household management (the act of overseeing the organizational, financial, day-to-day operations of a house or estate, and the managing of other domestic concerns). This domestic consumption work creates goods and services within a household, such as meals, childcare, household repairs, or the manufacture of clothes and gifts. Common tasks include cleaning, cooking, and looking after children. A person in charge of the homemaking, who isn't employed outside the home, is in the U.S. and Canada often called a homemaker, a gender-neutral term for a housewife or a househusband. The term "homemaker", however, may also refer to a social worker who manages a household during the incapacity of the housewife or househusband.

Housework is not always a lifetime commitment; many, for economic or personal reasons, return to the workplace. In previous decades, there were many mandatory courses for the young to learn the skills of homemaking. In high school, courses included cooking, nutrition, home economics, family and consumer science (FACS), and food and cooking hygiene. This last one may underlie the tradition that a homemaker is portrayed wearing an apron. More recently, most of these courses have been abolished, and many youths in high school and college would be more likely to study child development and the management of children's behavior.

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