Seeing the forest through the trees with a new LiDAR system

Shortly after lasers were first developed in the 1960s, LiDAR—whose name originated as a combination of "light" and "radar"—capitalized on the newly unique precision they offered for measuring both time and distance. ...

Holographic measurement technology at production speed

Fault tolerance in automobile production is increasingly diminishing. Until recently, this presented suppliers with a problem: There were no sufficient methods for detecting micro defects during production. Visual inspection ...

Electron holography of individual proteins

Proteins are the tools of life. In future, scientists may be able to examine single molecules with an especially gentle method to determine how they are constructed, how they perform their functions in cells, and how they ...

page 1 from 3

Holography

Holography (from the Greek ὅλος hólos, "whole" + γραφή grafē, "writing, drawing") is a technique that allows the light scattered from an object to be recorded and later reconstructed so that when an imaging system (a camera or an eye) is placed in the reconstructed beam, an image of the object will be seen even when the object is no longer present. The image changes as the position and orientation of the viewing system changes in exactly the same way as if the object were still present, thus making the image appear three-dimensional. This effect can be seen in the figure on the right where the orientation of the mouse is significantly different in the two images and its position relative to other parts of the scene has changed. The holographic recording itself is not an image – it consists of an apparently random structure of either varying intensity, density or profile – an example can be seen in Figure 4 below.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA