Touchable Hologram Becomes Reality (w/ Video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers from the University of Tokyo have developed 3D holograms that can be touched with bare hands. Generally, holograms can't be felt because they're made only of light. But the new technology adds ...

Sonic tractor beam invented (w/ Video)

A team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Sussex in collaboration with Ultrahaptics have built the world's first sonic tractor beam that can lift and move objects using sound waves.

Who cares about the fourth dimension?

Austrian scientists are trying to understand the mysteries of the holographic principle: How many dimensions are there in our universe?

Moving holograms: From science fiction to reality (w/ Video)

Remember the Star Wars scene in which R2D2 projects a three-dimensional image of a troubled Princess Leia delivering a call for help to Luke Skywalker and his allies? What used to be science fiction is now close to becoming ...

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Holography

Holography (from the Greek ὅλος hólos, "whole" + γραφή grafē, "writing, drawing") is a technique that allows the light scattered from an object to be recorded and later reconstructed so that when an imaging system (a camera or an eye) is placed in the reconstructed beam, an image of the object will be seen even when the object is no longer present. The image changes as the position and orientation of the viewing system changes in exactly the same way as if the object were still present, thus making the image appear three-dimensional. This effect can be seen in the figure on the right where the orientation of the mouse is significantly different in the two images and its position relative to other parts of the scene has changed. The holographic recording itself is not an image – it consists of an apparently random structure of either varying intensity, density or profile – an example can be seen in Figure 4 below.

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