More plant diversity, less pesticide

Increasing plant diversity enhances the natural control of insect herbivory in grasslands. Species-rich plant communities support natural predators and simultaneously provide less valuable food for herbivores. This was found ...

Plants can camouflage odours to avoid being eaten: study

Plants in dense tropical forests are able to mask their chemical scents in order to avoid being detected and eaten by insects—a key advantage in the "information arms race" between themselves and plant-eating herbivores, ...

New bacteria toxins against resistant insect pests

Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria (Bt toxins) are used in organic and conventional farming to manage pest insects. Sprayed as pesticides or produced in genetically modified plants, Bt toxins, used in pest control ...

Caterpillars attracted to plant SOS

Plants that emit an airborne distress signal in response to herbivory may actually attract more enemies, according to a new study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Plant Science .

Figuring out how wild wheat protects itself from insects

Wheat is a staple crop that provides 20% of the world population's caloric and human protein intake. Although wheat is essential for human and livestock diets, these plants are continuously preyed upon by insect herbivores ...

Using different scents to attract or repel insects

Flowering plants attract pollinating insects with scent from their flowers and bright colours. If they have become infested with herbivores like caterpillars, they attract beneficial insects like parasitic wasps with the ...

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