Related topics: software

How to program unreliable chips

As transistors get smaller, they also become less reliable. So far, computer-chip designers have been able to work around that problem, but in the future, it could mean that computers stop improving at the rate we've come ...

Nebula One steps forth as world's first cloud computer

(Phys.org) —Nebula has announced its first product, Nebula One. The new entry is defined in a promotional video (with symphonic, celestial music and a British voiceover for gravitas) as the world's first cloud computer. ...

Metaio announces AR processing unit for phones

(Phys.org)—Metaio this week announced its AREngine, an augmented reality chip that closes in on the future of smartphones as AR devices for daily use. The hardware chipset being introduced is a jump up for Metaio which ...

Linux and Intel 386 processors will part ways

(Phys.org)—Earlier this week Linus Torvalds took away support for 386 CPUs from the Linux kernel. He agreed with the position of Red Hat engineer and Linux kernel developer Ingo Molnar to drop support for Intel's old 386 ...

PUFFIN offers graphics card breakthrough versus break-in

(Phys.org)—The PUFFIN Project has come up with research that suggests GPU manufacturing processes leave each product with a unique kind of fingerprint. PUFFIN stands for physically unclonable functions found in standard ...

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Hardware

Hardware is a general term that refers to the physical artifacts of a technology. It may also mean the physical components of a computer system, in the form of computer hardware.

Hardware historically meant the metal parts and fittings that were used to make wooden products stronger, more functional, longer lasting and easier to fabricate or assemble.[citation needed]

Modern hardware stores typically sell equipment such as keys, locks, hinges, latches, corners, handles, wire, chains, plumbing supplies, tools, utensils, cutlery and machine parts, especially when they are made of metal.[citation needed]

In a more colloquial sense, hardware can refer to military equipment, such as tanks, aircraft, ships or munitions. In the case of vehicles, such may instead be referred to as armour.

In slang, the term can also refer to trophies and other physical representations of awards.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA