Related topics: bacteria · immune system

Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats

The cat is the only animal, aside from humans and primates, which spontaneously develops type 2 diabetes. Therefore, researchers are interested in studying how diabetes develops in cats in order to learn more about the disease ...

How milk does an animal body good

It has been called the world's most perfect food, and there's unequivocal evidence that it can fight off disease and build better baby brains. But even after decades of research, very little is known about how breast milk ...

Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning

Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study publishing on April 9 in the open-access ...

Edible antibodies to treat and prevent gastrointestinal disorders

Therapeutic antibodies are increasingly being used in the clinic for the treatment of diseases. Yet, oral to gut targeting of antibodies remains a challenge due to their inability to survive digestion and reach gastrointestinal ...

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Gastrointestinal tract

The digestive tract is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining matter. The major function of the gastrointestinal tract are ingestion, digestion, absorption, and defecation. The GI tract differs substantially from animal to animal. Some animals have multi-chambered stomachs, while some animals' stomachs contain a single box. In a human adult male, the GI tract is approximately 6.5 meters (20 feet) long and consists of the upper and lower GI tracts. The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment of the tract.

The remainder of this article focuses on human gastrointestinal anatomy; see digestion for the process in other organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA