Related topics: bacteria · immune system

How viruses and bacteria balance each other in the gut microbiome

The adage 'all things in moderation' applies not to just to food and drink, but also to the legions of bacteria inside our guts helping us digest that food and drink. It turns out the rule may also extend to the lesser understood ...

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

An international team of scientists has collated all known bacterial genomes from the human gut microbiome into a single large database, allowing researchers to explore the links between bacterial genes and proteins, and ...

A new species of darkling beetle larvae that degrade plastic

An enormous plastic garbage island exists in the North Pacific that is seven times the size of the Korean Peninsula. The island, called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, is the result of 13 million tons of plastic that flow ...

Microbiome confers resistance to cholera

Cholera can kill within hours if left untreated, and it sickens as many as 4 million people a year. In a new article in the journal Cell, researchers describe how gut bacteria helps people resist the disease.

Common food additive causes adverse health effects in mice

A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the U.S. and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression ...

Mapping microbiomes to improve food quantity, quality and safety

Thanks to its key role in development, immunity and nutrition, the microbiome—the genetic material of all microorganisms that live in the human body—has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. The gut microbiome ...

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Gastrointestinal tract

The digestive tract is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining matter. The major function of the gastrointestinal tract are ingestion, digestion, absorption, and defecation. The GI tract differs substantially from animal to animal. Some animals have multi-chambered stomachs, while some animals' stomachs contain a single box. In a human adult male, the GI tract is approximately 6.5 meters (20 feet) long and consists of the upper and lower GI tracts. The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment of the tract.

The remainder of this article focuses on human gastrointestinal anatomy; see digestion for the process in other organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA