Getting to know your microbiome better

In recent years, our gut microbiome has expanded from the relative obscurity of a culture dish to become firmly established in popular culture.

Rare animals and plants organize in ghettos to survive

Similar to the organization of human cities, animal and plant communities have ghettos or ethnic neighborhoods, where low-abundant species group to enhance their persistence against more competitive species. This unexpected ...

Bats don't rely on gut bacteria the way humans do

Right now, there are trillions of bacteria living in your gut, making up about one percent of your body weight. They're supposed to be there—we need them to help us digest food and fight off diseases. The same is true for ...

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