Related topics: microbes

Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?

The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to ...

How microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour

Researchers at the University of Oxford have proposed an evolutionary framework to understand why microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour, published in Nature Reviews Microbiology. Katerina Johnson (Department ...

In zebrafish, the cholera bacterium sets off a surprising flush

Researchers experimenting with live zebrafish witnessed a 200-percent increase in the strength of intestinal contractions soon after exposure to the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae, leading to expulsion of native ...

Treating koalas for chlamydia alters gut microbes

Koalas are one of Australia's iconic animals, but they have been hard hit by an epidemic of Chlamydia infections contributing to a steep decline in numbers. Sick koalas brought to wildlife hospitals may be treated with antibiotics ...

Gut reactions to improve probiotics

When bacteria enter the body, they have a great deal to overcome to colonize the colon. First, they must survive harsh environments with very few salts without bursting (unlike human blood cells within water). Then, they ...

Termites' unique gut 'factory' key to global domination

Termites have achieved ecological dominance and now some of the ingredients for their success have been determined to lie in their unique gut microbiome 'factories' - which enable the creatures to eat wood, soil and other ...

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