The roots of human altruism

Scientists have long been searching for the factor that determines why humans often behave so selflessly. It was known that humans share this tendency with species of small Latin American primates of the family Callitrichidae ...

Ravens understand the relations among others

Like many social mammals, ravens form different types of social relationships – they may be friends, kin, or partners and they also form strict dominance relations. From a cognitive perspective, understanding one's own ...

Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?

A crisis at work can bring out the best in colleagues, often inspiring more cooperation and self-sacrifice. A new study from Indiana University and the University of Guelphhas found that the benefits are not shared equally, ...

Why guppies have genital claws

New research from evolutionary biologists at the University of Toronto shows that the male guppy grows claws on its genitals to make it more difficult for unreceptive females to get away during mating.

Punishment promotes human cooperation when people trust each other

(Phys.org) —Why does the effectiveness of punishment to promote contributions to public goods differ among countries? According to psychologists Daniel Balliet and Paul van Lange at VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ...

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