Related topics: climate change · glaciers · sea level · ice · ice sheet

Catastrophic outburst floods carved Greenland's 'Grand Canyon'

Buried a mile beneath Greenland's thick ice sheet is a network of canyons so deep and long that the largest of these has been called Greenland's "Grand Canyon." This megacanyon's shape suggests it was carved by running water ...

2019 was Europe's hottest year ever: EU

Last year was the hottest in history across Europe as temperature records were shattered by a series of extreme heatwaves, the European Union's satellite monitoring surface said Wednesday.

Eurasian ice sheet collapse raised seas eight metres: study

The melting of the Eurasian ice sheet around 14,000 years ago lifted global sea levels by about eight metres, according to new research published Monday that highlights the risks of today's rapid ice cap melt.

Unusually clear skies drove record loss of Greenland ice in 2019

Last year was one of the worst years on record for the Greenland ice sheet, which shrunk by hundreds of billions of tons. According to a study published today in The Cryosphere, that mind-boggling ice loss wasn't caused by ...

Greenland ice sheet meltwater can flow in winter, too

Liquid meltwater can sometimes flow deep below the Greenland Ice Sheet in winter, not just in the summer, according to CIRES-led work published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters today. That finding means that ...

How the ocean is gnawing away at glaciers

The Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster today than it did only a few years ago. The reason: it's not just melting on the surface—but underwater, too. AWI researchers have now found an explanation for the intensive melting ...

Undersea volcanism may explain medieval year of darkness

Starting in 536 A.D., the sky went dark for more than a year. In some parts of Europe and Asia, the sun only shone for about four hours a day, and "accounts say the sun gave no more light than the moon," says Dallas Abbott, ...

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Greenland

Greenland (Danish: Grønland; Kalaallisut: Kalaallit Nunaat, meaning "Land of the people" ) is an autonomous country within the Kingdom of Denmark located between the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Though physiographically a part of the continent of North America, Greenland has been politically associated with Europe (specifically Denmark) since the 18th century.

In 1979, Denmark granted home rule to Greenland, with a relationship known in Danish as Rigsfællesskabet, and in 2008 Greenland voted to transfer more competencies to the local government. This became effective the following year, with the Danish royal government remaining in charge only of foreign affairs, security and financial policy, and providing a subsidy of Dkr3.4 billion ($633m), or approximately US$11,300 per Greenlander, annually.

Greenland is, by area, the world's largest island that is not a continent in its own right, as well as the least densely populated country in the world. However, since the 1950s, scientists have hypothesized that the ice cap covering the country may actually conceal three separate island land masses that have been bridged by glacier.

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