Related topics: climate change · glaciers · sea level · ice · ice sheet

Can extreme melt destabilize ice sheets?

Nearly a decade ago, global news outlets reported vast ice melt in the Arctic as sapphire lakes glimmered across the previously frozen Greenland Ice Sheet, one of the most important contributors to sea-level rise. Now researchers ...

New study: Thick sea-ice warms Greenland fjords

A new study led by Stockholm University Assistant Professor Christian Stranne shows that thick sea ice outside the fjords can actually increase the sensitivity of Greenlandic fjords to warming. Stranne and a team of researchers ...

What a glacial river reveals about the Greenland Ice Sheet

With data from a 2016 expedition, scientists supported by NASA are shedding more light into the complex processes under the Greenland Ice Sheet that control how fast its glaciers slide toward the ocean and contribute to sea ...

Melting ice sheets caused sea levels to rise up to 18 meters

It is well known that climate-induced sea level rise is a major threat. New research has found that previous ice loss events could have caused sea-level rise at rates of around 3.6 meters per century, offering vital clues ...

Greenland caves: Time travel to a warm Arctic

An international team of scientists led by Gina Moseley from the Department of Geology at the University of Innsbruck presents the very first analysis of sediments from a cave in northeast Greenland, that cover a time period ...

Icy ocean worlds seismometer passes further testing in Greenland

The NASA-funded Seismometer to Investigate Ice and Ocean Structure (SIIOS) performed well in seismic experiments conducted in snowy summer Greenland, according to a new study by the SIIOS team led by the University of Arizona ...

Greenland's ice melted away at least once in last million years

The ice sheet atop Greenland —which holds enough frozen water to swamp coastal cities worldwide—has melted to the ground at least once in the last million years despite CO2 levels far lower than today, stunned scientists ...

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Greenland

Greenland (Danish: Grønland; Kalaallisut: Kalaallit Nunaat, meaning "Land of the people" ) is an autonomous country within the Kingdom of Denmark located between the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Though physiographically a part of the continent of North America, Greenland has been politically associated with Europe (specifically Denmark) since the 18th century.

In 1979, Denmark granted home rule to Greenland, with a relationship known in Danish as Rigsfællesskabet, and in 2008 Greenland voted to transfer more competencies to the local government. This became effective the following year, with the Danish royal government remaining in charge only of foreign affairs, security and financial policy, and providing a subsidy of Dkr3.4 billion ($633m), or approximately US$11,300 per Greenlander, annually.

Greenland is, by area, the world's largest island that is not a continent in its own right, as well as the least densely populated country in the world. However, since the 1950s, scientists have hypothesized that the ice cap covering the country may actually conceal three separate island land masses that have been bridged by glacier.

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