Giant pudding was royal Christmas treat

Details of a ten-ton Christmas pudding, created to offset the blues of the Great Depression, have been rediscovered by University of Manchester historians.

Machines on the march threaten almost half of modern jobs

Computers have been an important part of many industries for decades already and have replaced humans in many jobs. But a new wave of technological development means that even positions that we once saw as immune to computerisation ...

Fears of Japanese aggression in wool trade

A Murdoch University researcher has uncovered a little known nugget of Australian history about a Japanese push to challenge the nation's wool dominance in the early 20th century.

Lawmaker accuses Google of dodging taxes (Update 2)

An influential committee of British lawmakers accused search company Google of dodging its taxes on Thursday in a scathing report that said the U.S. Internet company took on highly contrived arrangements serving no purpose ...

US incomes, poverty rate fall in 2011: official

US households saw incomes shrink for a second straight year in 2011 as the economy struggles to recover from the Great Recession, but the poverty rate also edged lower, official data showed Wednesday.

In tech first, US puts entire 1940 census online

The National Archives opened a treasure trove to genealogists and historians on Monday, releasing the 1940 national census in its entirety -- and doing so for the first time online.

A policy of mass destruction

A new analysis showing how the radical policies advocated by western economists helped to bankrupt Russia and other former Soviet countries after the Cold War has been released by researchers.

Research: Is fair value really fair?

As the United States continues its struggle to emerge from the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, a practice known as fair-value accounting has been taking heat. Critics—mostly banking associations—say ...

Study shows plants moved downhill, not up, in warming world

(PhysOrg.com) -- In a paper published today in the journal Science, a University of California, Davis, researcher and his co-authors challenge a widely held assumption that plants will move uphill in response to warmer temperatures.

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