Rogue planets: hunting the galaxy's most mysterious worlds

Most known planets orbit a star. These planets, including Earth, benefit from the star's warmth and light. And it is the light emitted from these stars which makes it possible for us to see them. But there are also "invisible" ...

Detection of gravitational wave 'lensing' could be some way off

Gravitational wave scientists looking for evidence of "lensing," in which the faintest gravitational wave signals become amplified, are unlikely to make these detections in the near future according to new analysis by scientists ...

ALMA sees most distant Milky Way look-alike

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which the European Southern Observatory (ESO) is a partner, have revealed an extremely distant and therefore very young galaxy that looks surprisingly ...

Astronomers find cosmic golden needle buried for two decades

Determined to find a needle in a cosmic haystack, a pair of astronomers time traveled through archives of old data from W. M. Keck Observatory on Mauankea in Hawaii and old X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory ...

Seeing the universe through new lenses

Like crystal balls for the universe's deeper mysteries, galaxies and other massive space objects can serve as lenses to more distant objects and phenomena along the same path, bending light in revelatory ways.

The mass of the universe

Bochum cosmologists headed by Professor Hendrik Hildebrandt have gained new insights into the density and structure of matter in the universe. Several years ago, Hildebrandt had already been involved in a research consortium ...

Taking the temperature of dark matter

Warm, cold, just right? Physicists at the University of California, Davis are taking the temperature of dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about a quarter of our universe.

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