Breakthrough in the search for graphene-based electronics

For 15 years, scientists have tried to exploit the "miracle material" graphene to produce nanoscale electronics. On paper, graphene should be great for just that: it is ultra-thin—only one atom thick and therefore two-dimensional, ...

Superior noise control using graphene

Noise is a dangerous worldwide environmental pollutant: at normal levels found in cities it can induce annoyance, stress and fluctuations in sleep patterns which in turn increase the risk of type-2 diabetes, arterial hypertension, ...

The subtle role of surfaces in ion stickiness

How ions stick to surfaces greatly influences vital processes in everything from water purifiers to batteries. For decades, scientists have debated the mechanics of such binding, or adsorption. Certain ions in water didn't ...

Nano-infused ceramic could report on its own health

A ceramic that becomes more electrically conductive under elastic strain and less conductive under plastic strain could lead to a new generation of sensors embedded into structures like buildings, bridges and aircraft able ...

Supercomputing helps study two-dimensional materials

Materials scientists study and understand the physics of interacting atoms in solids to find ways to improve materials we use in every aspect of daily life. The frontier of this research lies not in trial and error, though; ...

Magnetic graphene switches between insulator and conductor

Researchers have found that certain ultra-thin magnetic materials can switch from insulator to conductor under high pressure, a phenomenon that could be used in the development of next-generation electronics and memory storage ...

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