Why rumors spread fast in social networks

Information spreads fast in social networks. This could be observed during recent events. Now computer scientists from the German Saarland University provide the mathematical proof for this and come up with a surprising explanation.

Bursting neurons follow the same beat, sometimes

A simplified mathematical model of the brain's neural circuitry shows that repetitious, overlapped firing of neurons can lead to the waves of overly synchronized brain activity that may cause the halting movements that are ...

Can you hear the shape of a graph?

The Bristol exhibit focuses on quantum graphs, which can be thought of as a network of guitar strings tied to each other.  When a system like this vibrates it produces a series of sounds with different pitches.

Google introduces its Public Data Explorer

(PhysOrg.com) -- Google's latest release is an application that allows users to create their own interactive, animated graphs and charts using public data such as census data or government statistics on unemployment or mortality ...

Mathematics prize goes to University of Chicago's Hannah Alpert

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Association for Women in Mathematics has named Hannah Alpert, a third-year mathematics major at the University of Chicago, a co-winner of the 2010 Alice T. Schafer Prize for excellence in mathematics ...

Chart junk? How pictures may help make graphs better

Those oft-maligned, and highly embellished, graphs and charts in USA Today and other media outlets may actually help people understand data more effectively than traditional graphs, according to new research from North Carolina ...

Stock graphs can mislead: People prefer stocks with shorter runs

Can the way stock information is presented lead investors to make the wrong decisions? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that when investors use charts, they are likely to make a baseless decision about ...

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