Using satellites to measure rates of ice mass loss in glaciers

If you compare historical photos of glaciers with those taken more recently, you can see that where there was formerly ice, there is now very often nothing but rock. Geographers, however, are less interested in the area covered ...

Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland

The nutrient cycles that underpin how carbon is stored and released from two of Greenland's glaciers is significantly affected by subglacial weathering, a new study has found, shedding further light on the geochemistry of ...

More glaciers in East Antarctica are waking up

East Antarctica has the potential to reshape coastlines around the world through sea level rise, but scientists have long considered it more stable than its neighbor, West Antarctica. Now, new detailed NASA maps of ice velocity ...

Slow flow for glaciers thinning in Asia

Providing water for drinking, irrigation and power, glaciers in the world's highest mountains are a lifeline for more than a billion people. As climate change takes a grip and glaciers lose mass, one might think that, lubricated ...

Greenland ice loss quickening

Using a 25-year record of ESA satellite data, recent research shows that the pace at which Greenland is losing ice is getting faster.

Quirky glacial behavior explained

In August 2012, in the frigid wilderness of West Greenland, the Jakobshavn Glacier was flowing and breaking off into the sea at record speeds, three times faster than in previous years. An underwater calving event had caused ...

'Warm' ice in world's highest glacier

Ice temperatures inside the world's highest glacier on the slopes of Mount Everest are warmer than expected and especially vulnerable to future climate change, warn glaciologists.

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