Study traces the evolution of gill covers

The emergence of jaws in primitive fish allowed vertebrates to become top predators. What is less appreciated is another evolutionary innovation that may have been just as important for the success of early vertebrates: the ...

Invasive 'supervillain' crab can eat through its gills

Invasive green shore crabs can "eat" by absorbing nutrients across its gills—the first demonstration of this ability in crustaceans—scientists from the University of Alberta have found.

New type of symbiosis: Bacteria eat ammonia in fish gills

Microbiologists and fish researchers from Radboud University have discovered an entirely new type of symbiosis: bacteria in the gills of fish that convert harmful ammonia into harmless nitrogen gas. Environmental Microbiology ...

Study reveals how fish control microbes through their gills

Oriol Sunyer, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, has described fish as "an open gut swimming." Their mucosal surfaces—their skin, digestive tract and gills—are in constant contact ...

New method reduces need for fish in experiments

Fish are commonly used in experiments to identify environmental hazards and pollutants in water. As gills are in constant contact with the water, they are often the focal point for studies seeking to understand the effects ...

Sediment makes it harder for baby Nemo to breathe easy

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have discovered that suspended sediment damages fish gills and can increase the rate of disease in fish.

Testing the waters to fight infections like fish

A novel technology developed at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) to block human infections by taking a lesson from fish has landed a $50,000 grant from the National Science Foundation's Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program.

Study sheds new light on how some fish adapt to saltwater

(Phys.org) —Tilapia fish readily adapt to fresh or salty water, making them both good candidates for aquaculture and potential invasive pests. New work at the University of California, Davis, shows how tilapia can change ...

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