Living fossil genome unveiled

Published today in the open-access journal GigaScience, is an article that presents the genome sequence of Ginkgo biloba, the oldest extant tree species. The research was carried out by a team of scientists at BGI, Zheijiang ...

How the African clawed frog got an extra pair of genes

The African clawed frog's ancestor inherited one set of chromosomes each from two different species and doubled its whole genome some 18 million years ago, according to an international research consortium led by Japanese ...

Today's most successful fish weren't always evolutionary standouts

Take a glance around the oceans, rivers and lakes of today and you'll confront an astonishing diversity of fish, from narrow-bodied eels to the 25-foot-long giant oarfish to delicate, fluttering seahorses. The vast majority ...

Cuing environmental responses in fungi

Fungi can sense environmental signals and react accordingly, changing their development, direction of growth, and metabolism. Sensory perception lies at the heart of adaptation to changing conditions, and helps fungi to improve ...

Salmon genome collaboration published in Nature

SFU professor Willie Davidson is part of an international research team shedding new light on genome evolution. The researchers have established a "human" quality sequence of the Atlantic salmon genome that is now available ...

Mysteries of bony fish genome evolution

As the 20th-century novelist Joseph Conrad famously wrote, "It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose," and Nature is very busy, so she makes lots of them. But as a genius, she can use them to advantage. ...

How yeast doubled its genome—by mating between species

The common baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is used to make bread, wine and beer, and is the laboratory workhorse for a substantial proportion of research into molecular and cell biology. It was also the first non-bacterial ...

page 2 from 4