Reading out RNA structures in real time

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease and Stephen Hawking's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that results in the gradual loss of control over the muscles in the body. It is currently ...

New AI tool makes speedy gene-editing possible

An artificial intelligence program may enable the first simple production of customizable proteins called zinc fingers to treat diseases by turning genes on and off.

Researchers decipher comprehensive black-legged tick genome

A University of Maryland-led team of scientists has deciphered the first comprehensive, continuous genome for a parasite responsible for transmitting Lyme disease and other serious infections to hundreds of thousands of Americans ...

Atopic dermatitis in dogs linked to certain parts of the genome

Using new gene mapping methods, researchers have found connections between atopic dermatitis (eczema) in dogs and several regions of the genome. Some of the genes identified coincide with genes linked to similar problems ...

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Genetic research into dyslexia

and related disorders Education · Neuropsychology

Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Developmental dyslexia Dyslexia research Dyslexia support by country Management of dyslexia

Auditory processing disorder Dyscalculia · Dysgraphia Dysphasia · Dyspraxia Scotopic sensitivity syndrome

Reading acquisition Spelling · Literacy · Irlen filters Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Languages by Writing System Dyslexia support People with dyslexia Dyslexia in fiction

The genetic research into dyslexia has its roots in the work of Galaburda and Kemper, 1979, and Galaburda et al. 1985, from the examination of post-autopsy brains of people with dyslexia. When they observed anatomical differences in the language center in a dyslexic brain, they showed microscopic cortical malformations known as extopias and more rarely vascular micro-malformations, and in some instances these cortical malformations appeared as a microgyrus. These studies and those of Cohen et al. 1989 suggested abnormal cortical development which was presumed to occur before or during the sixth month of foetal brain development.

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