Bats can use 'vocal learning' to change their tune

Humans learn to speak by mimicking speech sounds. Are there other mammals who can learn sounds by imitation? In an experimental study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen and the Ludwig ...

OsFIT and OsIRO2 interact to regulate iron homeostasis in rice

Iron (Fe) is necessary for plant growth and development because it is involved in many physiological and biochemical reactions. Fe deficiency can cause serious agricultural problems. It is well known that Fer‐like Fe deficiency‐induced ...

Researchers move closer to producing heparin in the lab

In a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), University of California San Diego researchers moved one step closer to the ability to make heparin in cultured cells. Heparin is ...

Gene switch ENO identified as a tomato fruit regulator

A team of researchers from Spain, Germany and France has identified the gene switch ENO (excessive number of floral organs) as a tomato fruit regulator. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, ...

New world map of fish genetic diversity

An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the ...

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Genetic research into dyslexia

and related disorders Education · Neuropsychology

Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Developmental dyslexia Dyslexia research Dyslexia support by country Management of dyslexia

Auditory processing disorder Dyscalculia · Dysgraphia Dysphasia · Dyspraxia Scotopic sensitivity syndrome

Reading acquisition Spelling · Literacy · Irlen filters Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Languages by Writing System Dyslexia support People with dyslexia Dyslexia in fiction

The genetic research into dyslexia has its roots in the work of Galaburda and Kemper, 1979, and Galaburda et al. 1985, from the examination of post-autopsy brains of people with dyslexia. When they observed anatomical differences in the language center in a dyslexic brain, they showed microscopic cortical malformations known as extopias and more rarely vascular micro-malformations, and in some instances these cortical malformations appeared as a microgyrus. These studies and those of Cohen et al. 1989 suggested abnormal cortical development which was presumed to occur before or during the sixth month of foetal brain development.

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