Diversity in typhoid bacteria linked to higher mortality rates

Worldwide, 20% of the bacterial strains that cause typhoid fever have genetic variations in their external layer, called Vi capsule, that provide higher virulence, higher infectivity and high antibiotic resistance, Cornell ...

How a global collaboration is helping protect biodiversity

Ask a 10-year-old to name some extinct animals and they can usually rattle off ancient species such as the Tasmanian Tiger, Woolly Mammoth and Dodo. Some may even be able to tell you what the animals used to look like without ...

Scientists sequence entire genome of Australian bilby

Under pressure from predatory foxes and cats and competing with feral rabbits, the Greater bilby has lost more than 80% of its habitat. Conservation work led by Professor Carolyn Hogg is designed to help save the bilby from ...

From wild to sweet: Decoding the jujube's genetic journey

Chinese jujube, known for its economic and nutritional significance, was domesticated from its wild ancestor. While previous studies have shed light on some aspects of its domestication, many genetic details remain unexplored. ...

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Genetic diversity

Genetic diversity is a level of biodiversity that refers to the total number of genetic characteristics in the genetic makeup of a species. It is distinguished from genetic variability, which describes the tendency of genetic characteristics to vary.

The academic field of population genetics includes several hypotheses and theories regarding genetic diversity. The neutral theory of evolution proposes that diversity is the result of the accumulation of neutral substitutions. Diversifying selection is the hypothesis that two subpopulations of a species live in different environments that select for different alleles at a particular locus. This may occur, for instance, if a species has a large range relative to the mobility of individuals within it. Frequency-dependent selection is the hypothesis that as alleles become more common, they become less fit. This is often invoked in host-pathogen interactions, where a high frequency of a defensive allele among the host means that it is more likely that a pathogen will spread if it is able to overcome that allele.

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