New CRISPR platform expands RNA editing capabilities

CRISPR-based tools have revolutionized our ability to target disease-linked genetic mutations. CRISPR technology comprises a growing family of tools that can manipulate genes and their expression, including by targeting DNA ...

Scientists breed goats that produce spider silk

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers from the University of Wyoming have developed a way to incorporate spiders' silk-spinning genes into goats, allowing the researchers to harvest the silk protein from the goats’ milk for a variety ...

DNA structure influences the function of transcription factors

Substances known as transcription factors often determine how a cell develops as well as which proteins it produces and in what quantities. Transcription factors bind to a section of DNA and control how strongly a gene in ...

Beta cells from love handles

Researchers at ETH Zurich have managed to use a synthetic genetic program to instruct stem cells taken from fatty tissue to become cells that are almost identical to natural beta cells. This brings them a major step closer ...

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Genetic research into dyslexia

and related disorders Education · Neuropsychology

Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Developmental dyslexia Dyslexia research Dyslexia support by country Management of dyslexia

Auditory processing disorder Dyscalculia · Dysgraphia Dysphasia · Dyspraxia Scotopic sensitivity syndrome

Reading acquisition Spelling · Literacy · Irlen filters Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Languages by Writing System Dyslexia support People with dyslexia Dyslexia in fiction

The genetic research into dyslexia has its roots in the work of Galaburda and Kemper, 1979, and Galaburda et al. 1985, from the examination of post-autopsy brains of people with dyslexia. When they observed anatomical differences in the language center in a dyslexic brain, they showed microscopic cortical malformations known as extopias and more rarely vascular micro-malformations, and in some instances these cortical malformations appeared as a microgyrus. These studies and those of Cohen et al. 1989 suggested abnormal cortical development which was presumed to occur before or during the sixth month of foetal brain development.

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