Harmful genetic mutations may be less common than we thought

We are all mutants. Every characteristic that defines our species is the result of a genetic mutation somewhere in the history of evolution. And the same is true for every other organism on the planet. Yet more often than ...

New method predicts evolution

Predicting chance-driven evolution seems impossible. Nevertheless, scientists from AMOLF in Amsterdam and the ESPCI in Paris have succeeded in making predictions about the evolution of a set of genes in E. coli. When and ...

New CRISPR method efficiently corrects DMD defect in heart tissue

Scientists have developed a CRISPR gene-editing technique that can potentially correct a majority of the 3,000 mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by making a single cut at strategic points along the patient's ...

Enhancer adoption changes limb morphology

The difference between webbed toes and distinct digits may result from how genes regulate genetic information. Researchers at the National Institute of Genetics, Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS) in ...

Digging deep into distinctly different DNA

A University of Queensland discovery has deepened our understanding of the genetic mutations that arise in different tissues, and how these are inherited.

More complex biological systems evolve more freely

Our genes (aka. the genotype) determine our characteristics (aka. the phenotype). Evolution acts on changes in the phenotype, which occur when mutations change the underlying genotype. But what changes to the phenotype can ...

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