Festive treat for stargazers as Geminid meteors peak

Stargazers across the northern hemisphere could see as many as 70 meteors an hour this coming Sunday, as the Geminids meteor shower reaches its peak. Prospects for what should be this year's best display of meteors are particularly ...

Video: Enjoying the Geminids from above and below

On the night of December 13, into the morning of December 14, 2018, tune into the night sky for a dazzling display of fireballs. Thanks to the International Space Station, this sky show – the Geminids meteor shower—will ...

Impressive Geminid Meteors to Peak on December 13–14

If it's clear Wednesday night and Thursday before dawn, keep a lookout high overhead for the "shooting stars" of the Geminid meteor shower. That's the peak night for this annual display.

Viewing guide to the 2015 Geminid meteor shower

2015 looks like a fantastic year for the Geminids. With the Moon just 3 days past new and setting at the end of evening twilight, conditions couldn't be more ideal. Provided the weather cooperates! But even there we get a ...

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Geminids

The Geminids are a meteor shower caused by the object 3200 Phaethon, which is thought to be a Palladian asteroid. This would make the Geminids, together with the Quadrantids, the only major meteor showers not originating from a comet. The meteors from this shower are slow moving, can be seen in December and usually peak around the 13th - 14th of the month, with the date of highest intensity being the morning of the 14th. The shower is thought to be intensifying every year and recent showers have seen 120–160 meteors per hour under optimal conditions, generally around 2am to 3am local time. Geminids were first observed only 150 years ago, much more recently than other showers such as the Perseids and Leonids[citation needed].

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