White people struggle to perceive emotion on black people's faces

An international study, in which the University of Granada (UGR) participated, has found that white people have difficulty distinguishing emotions on black people's faces—a problem that does not appear to arise the other ...

Myth of Mona Lisa's magical gaze debunked

In science, the "Mona Lisa Effect" refers to the impression that the eyes of the person portrayed in an image seem to follow the viewer as they move in front of the picture. Two researchers from the Cluster of Excellence ...

The color of people's clothing affects lizard escape behavior

The color of T-shirts people wear affects escape behavior in western fence lizards, according to a study published August 9, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Breanna Putman from University of California, Los Angeles ...

Monkeys and humans share staring behavior

Following another's gaze is a hallmark of human learning and socialization from infancy to old age. Humans change how they follow gazes throughout life, and disruptions in the ability to follow someone's gaze are warning ...

How eye tracking gives players a new experience in video games

Tracking people's eye movements is a concept that for a long time has captured people's imagination. More often than not, the technology has been depicted as part of rather dystopian futures: in the movie Minority Report, ...

Dogs are able to follow human gaze

Dogs are known to be excellent readers of human body language in multiple situations. Surprisingly, however, scientists have so far found that dogs do not follow human gaze into distant space. Scientists at the Messerli Research ...

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Gaze

Gaze is a psychoanalytical term brought into popular usage by Jacques Lacan to describe the anxious state that comes with the awareness that one can be viewed. The psychological effect, Lacan argues, is that the subject loses some sense of autonomy upon realizing that he or she is a visible object. This concept is bound with his theory of the mirror stage, in which a child encountering a mirror realizes that he or she has an external appearance. Lacan suggests that this gaze effect can similarly be produced by any conceivable object such as a chair or a television screen. This is not to say that the object behaves optically as a mirror; instead it means that the awareness of any object can induce an awareness of also being an object.

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