Gas insulation could be protecting an ocean inside Pluto

A gassy insulating layer beneath the icy surfaces of distant celestial objects could mean there are more oceans in the universe than previously thought. Computer simulations provide compelling evidence that an insulating ...

Preventing concrete bridges from falling apart

Extremes of temperature, rain, exposure to corrosive substances—all of these environmental factors contribute to the degradation of concrete. Specifically, a gas present in our environment, called hydrogen sulphide, turns ...

Researchers document widespread methane seeps off Oregon coast

For the past two years, scientists from Oregon State University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have surveyed the Pacific Northwest near-shore region mapping sites where underwater bubble streams ...

Video: Burning ice from the ocean floor

Methane hydrate is a crystalline complex of water and methane that forms beneath the ocean floor. It resembles regular ice, but it can easily be set aflame after it's brought to the surface.

Advanced knowledge and new technologies in gas hydrate research

Gas hydrates are considered a potential source of energy. Over the past 10 years, the Submarine Gas Hydrate Deposits (SUGAR) project has significantly expanded the basic knowledge of gas hydrates and resulted in the development ...

Stable gas hydrates can trigger landslides

Like avalanches onshore,many processes cause submarine landslides. One very widespread assumption is that they are associated with dissociating gas hydrates in the seafloor. However, scientists at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre ...

Why did gas hydrates melt at the end of the last ice age?

Methane hydrates, also known as "burning ice," occur at all ocean margins. The compound of gas and water occurs in the seafloor and it is only stable under relatively high pressures and low temperatures. If the pressure is ...

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