Flow-through electrodes make hydrogen 50 times faster

Electrolysis, passing a current through water to break it into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, could be a handy way to store excess energy from wind or solar power. The hydrogen can be stored and used as fuel later, when the ...

Making terahertz waves: Why liquids prefer long optical pulses

Laser-induced ionization in matter—gas, cluster, liquid, and solid—occurs when a laser pulse with sufficient intensity is focused into a target material, creating electrons and ions through nonlinear processes of laser-matter ...

Production sites of stars are rare

Astronomers using the Nobeyama Radio Obeservatory (NRO) 45-meter telescope found that high-density gas, the material for stars, accounts for only 3 percent of the total mass of gas distributed in the Milky Way. This result ...

The world of plastics, in numbers

From its early beginnings during and after World War II, the commercial industry for polymers – long chain synthetic molecules of which "plastics" are a common misnomer – has grown rapidly. In 2015, over 320 million tons ...

New thruster design increases efficiency for future spaceflight

Hall thrusters (HTs) are used in earth-orbiting satellites, and also show promise to propel robotic spacecraft long distances, such as from Earth to Mars. The propellant in a HT, usually xenon, is accelerated by an electric ...

Star formation in the outskirts of galaxies

Star formation environments can be roughly grouped into three types, categorized by the density of their gas (or more precisely, the projected "surface" density of the gas, which is easier to determine than the conventional ...

How strong is gravity on other planets?

Gravity is a fundamental force of physics, one which we Earthlings tend to take for granted. You can't really blame us. Having evolved over the course of billions of years in Earth's environment, we are used to living with ...

Planetary influences on young stellar disks

A newborn star typically has a disk of gas and dust from which planets develop as the dust grains collide, stick together and grow. Stars older than about five million years lack evidence for these disks, however, suggesting ...

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