Q&A: Behind the scenes with an earthquake scientist

Sylvain Barbot is trying to do what can't be done yet: reliably predict earthquakes. The assistant professor at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences knows that it's impossible—at least not yet. But he ...

Sinking sea mountains make and muffle earthquakes

Subduction zones—places where one tectonic plate dives beneath another—are where the world's largest and most damaging earthquakes occur. A new study has found that when underwater mountains—also known as seamounts—are ...

The golden path towards new two-dimensional semiconductors

Two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors are promising for quantum computing and future electronics. Now, researchers can convert metallic gold into semiconductor and customize the material atom-by-atom on boron nitride nanotubes.

Ultrashort light pulses for fast 'lightwave' computers

Extremely short, configurable "femtosecond" pulses of light demonstrated by an international team could lead to future computers that run up to 100,000 times faster than today's electronics.

Simple wavelength detector could speed data communications

(Phys.org) —Researchers at SLAC and Stanford have created a new device, smaller than a grain of rice, that could streamline optical data communications. It can directly identify the wavelength of light that hits it, and ...

Physicists observe new magnetic state of bismuth ferrite

(Phys.org) —Using computer models, a graduate student at the University of Arkansas has collaborated with scientists in the United States and Europe to observe a new magnetic state of bismuth ferrite.

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