Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers. These problems are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation ...

Polymer movement: key to next-generation coatings

Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, led by doctoral student Victor Selin and Dr. Svetlana Sukhishvili, are making headway in understanding fundamental principles that ...

Scientist describes fundamental process when ice is compressed

Almost three-quarters of the earth's surface is covered by water. Almost two-thirds of the human body is made up of it. We drink it. We use it in our homes and in industry. As a solid, it's ice. As a gas, it's steam.

Giant machine shows how a computer works

A giant, fully operational 16-bit computer that aims to demystify the strange and seemingly magical mechanisms of computation has been built by students and staff from the University of Bristol.

A quantum simulator of impossible physics

The research group Quantum Technologies for Information Science (QUTIS) of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Countr has created a quantum simulator that is capable of creating unphysical phenomena in the atomic world—in ...

Slow light speeds up the microscopic world

A team of researchers from the University of St Andrews and the University of York has slowed down the speed of light in a process which could have major applications in fundamental science and medical diagnosis.

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