How worms snare their hosts

Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. However, only certain species of fish are suitable as hosts. A study by the University of Bonn now shows how the parasites ...

Microplastics are not just a problem for the oceans

From the infamous "garbage patch" islands of floating plastic to the guts of fish and bellies of birds, plastics of all sizes are ubiquitous and well-documented in the ocean. But little data exists on microplastics in lakes.

How drought affects freshwater fish

When we think of a river, dark, cool rushing water —full of energy and life —comes to mind. Yet, in the face of climate change we are frequently witnessing almost entirely dry river beds with barely enough water to ...

Report: Wildlife populations halved on average since '70s

Global wildlife populations have fallen an average of 58 percent from 1970 levels, with human activity reducing the numbers of elephants in Tanzania, maned wolves in Brazil, salamanders in the United States and orcas in the ...

Environmental hormones – tiny amounts, big effects

Empty nets and few species – environmental hormones are believed responsible for the diminishing numbers of fish. How damaging are these substances really, though? Studies that depict a complete picture of the lives of ...

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