Smart solution to detect seafood spoilage

Importantly, Flinders University's Professor of Aquaculture Jian Qin—who led the study with Flinders colleague Professor Youhong Tang—says this simple device could become commercially viable and enable a "real-time" monitoring ...

Arcobacter abundant in Hurricane Florence floodwaters

A North Carolina State University research team's search for Campylobacter in the floodwaters from Hurricane Florence instead uncovered an abundance of a related emerging pathogen: Arcobacter. The study raises questions about ...

New technique to pinpoint source of food poisoning

Scientists at the University of Aberdeen have developed a new technique which could help to identify the source of food poisoning or infection more quickly and accurately than current methods.

Cheese: New insights into an age-old food

The most detailed study to date of the microbes in cheese was published today in Nature Food by a team of researchers at Teagasc and APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Center, led by Professor Paul Cotter. For this study, ...

Rapid test to detect salmonella in food

Anyone can get salmonella poisoning, but babies, toddlers, the elderly and people with immunodeficiencies are particularly susceptible. For people with weakened immune systems, the gastrointestinal disease can lead to serious ...

page 1 from 8

Food poisoning

Food poisoning refers to acute illness due to the ingestion of food. It can lead to infectious diarrhea.

The term usually includes:

The term usually does not include the consequences of invasive organisms acquired via the food supply. (The broader term foodborne illness includes these conditions.)

Onset of food poisoning following the consumption of the tainted food or drink can last from one to ten days.[clarification needed]

Food poisoning can be a notifiable disease in some jurisdictions. An alarming number of people are affected annually by food poisoning. Food poisoning endangers between sixty and eighty million people throughout the world each year and results in between six and eight million deaths.

Common causes of food poisoning: If the incubation period is less than six hours, a possible cause is Staphylococcus aureus toxin ingestion. Symptoms include vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. Another is Bacillus cereus toxin ingestion. Symptoms include vomiting, and nausea (the "emetic syndrome").[citation needed]

If the incubation period is more than ten hours, a possible cause is B. cereus toxin ingestion. Symptoms include diarrhea and cramps (the "diarrheal syndrome"). Another is ingestion of Clostridium perfringens bacteria, which release a toxin in the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms include diarrhea and cramps.[citation needed]

E. coli may also cause food poisoning with symptoms varying with the serotype.[citation needed]

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA