Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

The discovery, published today in Nature Communications by researchers from La Trobe University and the University of Queensland, provides details on how proteins in the outer membrane of bacteria—the bacteria's 'superglue'—are ...

The food poisoning find that could save lives

Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have made a discovery that has the potential to save lives when treating bacterial infections, especially serious food poisoning.

New, unusually large virus kills anthrax agent

From a zebra carcass on the plains of Namibia in Southern Africa, an international team of researchers has discovered a new, unusually large virus (or bacteriophage) that infects the bacterium that causes anthrax. The novel ...

Superbugs may have a soft spot, after all

The overuse of antibiotics has created strains of bacteria resistant to medication, making the diseases they cause difficult to treat, or even deadly. But now a research team at the University of Rochester has identified ...

Internal cellular sensors make Salmonella dangerous: study

(Phys.org) -- Salmonella becomes dangerously virulent only when molecular sensors within the organism sense changes in the environment, a team of researchers from the Yale School of Medicine and the Yale Microbial Diversity ...

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Food poisoning

Food poisoning refers to acute illness due to the ingestion of food. It can lead to infectious diarrhea.

The term usually includes:

The term usually does not include the consequences of invasive organisms acquired via the food supply. (The broader term foodborne illness includes these conditions.)

Onset of food poisoning following the consumption of the tainted food or drink can last from one to ten days.[clarification needed]

Food poisoning can be a notifiable disease in some jurisdictions. An alarming number of people are affected annually by food poisoning. Food poisoning endangers between sixty and eighty million people throughout the world each year and results in between six and eight million deaths.

Common causes of food poisoning: If the incubation period is less than six hours, a possible cause is Staphylococcus aureus toxin ingestion. Symptoms include vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. Another is Bacillus cereus toxin ingestion. Symptoms include vomiting, and nausea (the "emetic syndrome").[citation needed]

If the incubation period is more than ten hours, a possible cause is B. cereus toxin ingestion. Symptoms include diarrhea and cramps (the "diarrheal syndrome"). Another is ingestion of Clostridium perfringens bacteria, which release a toxin in the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms include diarrhea and cramps.[citation needed]

E. coli may also cause food poisoning with symptoms varying with the serotype.[citation needed]

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