Fruit flies learn their body size once for an entire lifetime

In order to orient themselves and survive in their environment, animals must develop a concept of their own body size. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have shown that the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster ...

From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise

In the battle of the sexes, males appear to have the innovative edge—from a genetic standpoint, at least. Scientists are finding that the testes are more than mere factories for sperm; these organs also serve as hotspots ...

Orchestrating development in the fly embryo

Most multicellular organisms on Earth—including you—begin as a single fertilized egg and then undergo a complex choreography of cellular growth to become a functioning adult composed of countless cells. Understanding ...

Parasitic bat flies offer window into lives of hosts

A new study on a Bahamian bat makes the case for using the species' unusual parasites to reveal details about the species' populations on the archipelago. Using parasites to glean information about their hosts isn't a new ...

Finding a gene that regulates sleep

What keeps us awake—and helps us fall asleep? The answer is complex, but involves what are called circadian rhythms, which are found in all species with sleep-wake cycles—physical, mental, and behavioral changes that ...

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