Study sheds light on mechanism of liposome accumulation in tumors

Dmitri Simberg, Ph.D., associate professor in the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy, has released the results of a study of the effectiveness of different types of fluorescent labels used to monitor the accumulation ...

High-throughput metabolic profiling of single cells

Scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have presented a new method for generating metabolic profiles of individual cells. The method, which combines fluorescence ...

Microscopy deep learning predicts viral infections

When viruses infect a cell, changes in the cell nucleus occur, and these can be observed through fluorescence microscopy. Using fluoresence images made in live cells, researchers at the University of Zurich have trained an ...

Researchers improve efficiency and accessibility of CRISPR

One of the most powerful tools available to biologists these days is CRISPR-Cas9, a combination of specialized RNA and protein that acts like a molecular scalpel, allowing researchers to precisely slice and dice pieces of ...

Cancer-promoting Ras protein exists in a pair within cells

Researchers from Bochum and Osnabrück have gained new insights into the structure of the Ras protein, which acts as a molecular switch for cell growth and is involved in the development of cancer. With the help of fluorescence ...

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Fluorescence

Fluorescence is the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation of a different wavelength. It is a form of luminescence. In most cases, emitted light has a longer wavelength, and therefore lower energy, than the absorbed radiation. However, when the absorbed electromagnetic radiation is intense, it is possible for one electron to absorb two photons; this two-photon absorption can lead to emission of radiation having a shorter wavelength than the absorbed radiation.

The most striking examples of fluorescence occur when the absorbed radiation is in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum, and thus invisible to the human eye, and the emitted light is in the visible region.

Fluorescence has many practical applications, including mineralogy, gemology, chemical sensors (fluorescence spectroscopy), fluorescent labelling, dyes, biological detectors, and, most commonly, fluorescent lamps.

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