Filter membrane renders viruses harmless

Viruses can spread not only via droplets or aerosols like the new coronavirus, but in water, too. In fact, some potentially dangerous pathogens of gastrointestinal diseases are water-borne viruses.

Understanding the growth of disease-causing protein fibres

Amyloid fibrils are deposits of proteins in the body that join together to form microscopic fibres. Their formation has been linked to many serious human diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Type 2 diabetes.

Scientists shine new light on heat-damaged hair

A new technique allowed researchers to observe in greater detail how heat alters keratin proteins, helping in their search for ingredients that can prevent heat-damaged hair.

Toadlet peptide transforms into a deadly weapon against bacteria

Researchers at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and EMBL Hamburg have discovered remarkable molecular properties of an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of the Australian toadlet. The discovery could inspire ...

Determining the slenderization of wood pulp

Researchers from the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University have devised a new method to determine the degree of fibrillation in wood pulp. By taking advantage of the intrinsic optical birefringence ...

Amyloid formation on the International Space Station

Amyloids, abnormal fibrillar aggregates of proteins, are associated with various disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of amyloid formation is critical for developing ...

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Fibril

Fibril is a fine fiber approximately 1 nm in diameter.[citation needed]

Cytoplasmic fibrils are observed on the protoplasmic cylinders found in most spirochetal species, although no function of the cytoplasmic fibrils has been ascribed.[citation needed]

Polysaccharides, the union of several linked monosaccharides, sometimes serve as a structural compound. Cellulose, the most abundant organic compound on Earth[citation needed], forms cable-like strings, known as fibrils in the tough walls that enclose plant cells. While cellulose is a compilation of glucose monomers, they form unbranched, long strands instead of coils like starch or glycogen. These are arranged in parallel lines which form on top of each other in an intricate layer through hydrogen bonding.[citation needed]

Insect flight muscle is said to be fibrillar, in that it contracts in response to being stretched by antagonistic muscle, so as to allow very rapid (up to 1000 Hz) contraction.[citation needed]

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