Probes shed new light on Alzheimer's cause

Rice University researchers have found a way to track the formation of soluble amyloid beta peptide aggregates implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

Chemists discover structure of glucagon fibrils

Patients with type 1 diabetes have to regularly inject themselves with insulin, a hormone that helps their cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream. Another hormone called glucagon, which has the opposite effect, is given ...

Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower

Collagen fibrils are a major component of the connective tissues found throughout the animal kingdom. The cable-like assemblies of long biological molecules combine to form tissues as varied as skin, corneas, tendons or bones. ...

Technique uses well-known dye to watch amyloid plaques in the brain

While amyloid plaques have long been closely associated with mechanisms driving Alzheimer's disease, visualizing how amyloid proteins assemble continues to prove difficult. The nanometer-sized amyloid fibrils are only a fraction ...

A boundary dance of amyloid-β stepping into dementia

Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. This aggregation is accelerated at the cell membrane surface. Using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments, the research group at ExCELLS ...

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Fibril

Fibril is a fine fiber approximately 1 nm in diameter.[citation needed]

Cytoplasmic fibrils are observed on the protoplasmic cylinders found in most spirochetal species, although no function of the cytoplasmic fibrils has been ascribed.[citation needed]

Polysaccharides, the union of several linked monosaccharides, sometimes serve as a structural compound. Cellulose, the most abundant organic compound on Earth[citation needed], forms cable-like strings, known as fibrils in the tough walls that enclose plant cells. While cellulose is a compilation of glucose monomers, they form unbranched, long strands instead of coils like starch or glycogen. These are arranged in parallel lines which form on top of each other in an intricate layer through hydrogen bonding.[citation needed]

Insect flight muscle is said to be fibrillar, in that it contracts in response to being stretched by antagonistic muscle, so as to allow very rapid (up to 1000 Hz) contraction.[citation needed]

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