The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed

Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. Now, an international collaborative study involving the University of Vienna, Zhejiang University ...

How birds become male or female, and occasionally both

The highly unusual "semi-identical" Australian twins reported last week are the result of a rare event. It's thought the brother and sister (who have identical genes from their mother but not their father) developed from ...

Intelligent males may make female birds swoon: study

Male birds are often the ones with the most vibrant feathers, or the most elaborate songs, but researchers said Thursday that what female birds could really appreciate is a male who shows his intelligence.

Among birds-of-paradise, good looks are not enough to win a mate

Male birds-of-paradise are notorious for their wildly extravagant feather ornaments, complex calls, and shape-shifting dance moves—all evolved to attract a mate. New research published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology ...

Becoming promiscuous to ensure reproduction

Females of a socially monogamous passerine, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor), become more promiscuous after hatchings fail in the first breeding attempt—apparently attempting to ensure successful reproduction.

Male birds sing less to females on antidepressants

During courtship male starlings sing less to females who have been fed dilute concentrations of antidepressants, according to a new study led by the University of York.

Polygamy observed in trio of great horned owls

A trio of great horned owls has been found to be engaging in a polygamous relationship according to an ornithologist with Bird Studies Canada. The finding has been reported by Doug Main with National Geographic.

Scientists remind their peers: Female birds sing, too

When North American ornithologists hear a bird singing, they're likely to assume it's a male. But in many species, the females sing too—and a new commentary in The Auk: Ornithological Advances argues that a better understanding ...

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