Related topics: brain · perception · anxiety

Urban dogs are more fearful than their cousins from the country

Fearfulness is one of the most common behavioural disorders in dogs. As an emotion, fear is a normal and vital reaction that helps individuals survive in threatening circumstances. When the fearfulness is excessive and disturbs ...

As pandemic unfolds, fear and finance collide

Despite global efforts to stall the spread of the novel coronavirus, growing fears surrounding the pandemic have caused markets to respond with record-breaking volatility. On Monday, the nation's volatility index, often referred ...

Pangolin sales plunge in Gabon over coronavirus fears

Pangolins were once a prized item in the markets of Gabon's capital Libreville, but bushmeat sellers have started hiding the small, scaly mammals behind boar legs and porcupine carcasses.

Anxieties and problematic behaviors may be common in pet dogs

Anxieties and behaviour problems may be common across dog breeds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that noise sensitivity is the most common anxiety trait, followed by fear.

page 1 from 63

Fear

Fear is an emotional response to threats and danger. It is a basic survival mechanism occurring in response to a specific stimulus, such as pain or the threat of pain. Psychologists John B. Watson, Robert Plutchik, and Paul Ekman have suggested that fear is one of a small set of basic or innate emotions. This set also includes such emotions as joy, sadness, and anger. Fear should be distinguished from the related emotional state of anxiety, which typically occurs without any external threat. Additionally, fear is related to the specific behaviors of escape and avoidance, whereas anxiety is the result of threats which are perceived to be uncontrollable or unavoidable. Worth noting is that fear always relates to future events, such as worsening of a situation, or continuation of a situation that is unacceptable.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA