The iceberg’s accomplice: Did the moon sink the Titanic?

(PhysOrg.com) -- The sinking of the ocean liner Titanic 100 years ago is perhaps the most famous--and most studied--disaster of the 20th century. Countless books and movies have examined in great detail the actions, choices ...

Why guppies have genital claws

New research from evolutionary biologists at the University of Toronto shows that the male guppy grows claws on its genitals to make it more difficult for unreceptive females to get away during mating.

Physics faculty try innovative teaching methods

A study of physics faculty awareness and use of research-based instructional techniques offers greater understanding of what is missing from current education reform efforts

Marie Curie, go home: Science faculty study shows bias

(Phys.org)—A study published in PNAS shows that science faculty members, both men and women, need to bring up their poor grades in gender bias. The study. "Science Faculty's Subtle Gender Biases Favor Male Students," reveals ...

Learning how (and how not) to learn

It's sad but true: most of us never learned how to learn, even though we're expected to do it all the time. This is especially true for college students, who fall prey to ineffective study habits, like reading their notes ...

'Pedigree is not destiny' when it comes to scholarly success

What matters more to a scientist's career success: where they currently work, or where they got their Ph.D.? It's a question a team of researchers teases apart in a new paper published in PNAS. Their analysis calls into question ...

The 'woman who understood Newton'

In this month's edition of Physics World, Paula Findlen from Stanford University profiles Laura Bassi—an emblematic and influential physicist from the 18th century who can be regarded as the first ever woman to forge a ...

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