Related topics: genes · gene expression

Are animal traits the result of behavioral epigenetics?

A plant that is unremarkable in one environment becomes an invasive species in another, pushing through house foundations and sprouting up through roads. A house sparrow that's a perfectly charming resident of the English ...

Criticality in morphogenesis

(Phys.org) —In many regards, a brief time-lapse video can teach more about embryonic development than any amount of reading. It is hard not to be impressed how a repeatable form reliably emerges despite considerable variation ...

Novel polymer delivers genetic medicine, allows tracking

Theresa M. Reineke, associate professor of chemistry in the College of Science, and colleagues in her lab at Virginia Tech and at the University of Cincinnati have developed a new molecule that can travel into cells, deliver ...

Apple peel makes mice mighty

For Popeye, spinach was the key to extra muscle. For the mice in a new University of Iowa study, it was apples, or more precisely a waxy substance called ursolic acid that's found in apple peel.

Organic feed influences gene expression in chickens

(PhysOrg.com) -- Organically fed chickens develop a different process of gene expression in their small intestines than that of chickens which get conventional feed. The organic chickens have higher expressed genes involved ...

Ethylene of no effect: Why peppers do not mature after picking

(Phys.org) -- The plant hormone ethylene lets green tomatoes ripen even after the harvest, whereas the closely related chili peppers show no such effect. Researchers from the Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology ...

Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone

Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing February 14 in the open-access ...

New CRISPR tool targets RNA in mammalian cells

Researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have shown that a CRISPR-based editing system can cut and bind RNA in mammalian cells. In a paper out this week in Nature, the team used CRISPR-Cas13, which the researchers ...

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