Safer substitute for lead azide

Lead azide, which is toxic, is a basic component of munitions and detonators. LMU chemists have now synthesized a novel primary explosive that contains no lead.

Detecting trace amounts of explosives with light

(Phys.org) —University of Adelaide research may help in the fight against terrorism with the creation of a sensor that can detect tiny quantities of explosives with the use of light and special glass fibres.

Ultra-sensitive polymer detects explosive devices

(Phys.org) —A chemical that's often the key ingredient in improvised explosive devices (IEDs) can be quickly and safely detected in trace amounts by a new polymer created by a team of Cornell chemists.

Explosive origins for cosmic dust

(Phys.org)—The European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory has produced an intricate view of the remains of a star that died in a stellar explosion a millennium ago. This new view provides further proof that the ...

A celestial witch's broom?—A new view of the pencil nebula

(Phys.org)—The Pencil Nebula is pictured in a new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. This peculiar cloud of glowing gas is part of a huge ring of wreckage left over after a supernova explosion that took place ...

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